Posts Tagged ‘bash’

h1

Just for fun: map as ‘higher-order function’ in bash

March 8, 2008

Defined recursively, of course:

map () { 
  if [ $# -le 1 ]; then 
    return 
  else 
    local f=$1 
    local x=$2 
    shift 2 
    local xs=$@ 

    $f $x 

    map "$f" $xs 
  fi 
}

I’m not going to explain everything, but note the ‘local’ commands to keep everything in function scope (to prevent strange bugs) and the quotes around $f in the recursive call to prevent a ‘function call’ of multiple words from being split.

Now you can do some completely nonsensical things, for which you really don’t need map, such as:

$ map touch aap noot mies

But also slightly more useful things such as

$ map "echo foo" aap noot mies 
foo aap 
foo noot 
foo mies 

$ map "echo file:" `ls` 
file: aap 
file: noot 
file: mies

To open up some more possibilities, I also defined a ‘rota’ function, with rotates the arguments of a command such that the last comes first.

rota () { 
  local f=$1 
  shift 
  local args=($@) 
  local idx=$(($#-1)) 
  local last=${args[$idx]} 
  args[$idx]= 

  $f $last ${args[@]} 
}

I’m using a array (yes, bash has arrays) to easily get the last element, as you can see 😉

So, how about…

$ map "rota mv /tmp" aap noot mies

(Move the aap, noot and mies file to /tmp)

There are probably better (and more useful) examples of it’s usage, but you hopefully get the gist of it.

This code is just for fun (I don’t expect I’m ever going to use it, even), so it’s nowhere near being robust. There are a lot of (possible) bugs concerning spaces and undetected grouping of words (with double quotes). Use at your own risk 😉